Digging Deeper

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Digging Deeper

This is an amazingly hilarious romantic comedy and definitely one of the highlights of my summer reading experience. The story is full of zany antics and the author’s sense of comedic timing is perfect for the characters. The dialogue is sharp and witty and the plot moves at an amazingly energized pace.
 
The heroine of this story, Felicity Knyfe or Flick as she is nicknamed, is a young attractive woman who finds herself working several part time jobs in order to make ends meet. She’s had a family tragedy in her past and currently has a secret which has led to a sudden change in careers and is one of the reasons for her many jobs. One such job is at Hartington Hall doing whatever Lady Celia assigns to her and at the beginning of the book she is take care of the flower garden. The problem is that she is chased by one of the sheep on the property, which leads to her needing to be rescued. Flick is a warm and generous person who seems to be cursed with some of the worst luck on the planet, if something can go wrong, it does goes wrong and she’s usually in the center of it. She has a fantastic sense of wit and tries to keep a positive outlook on life, even when things go wrong. Flick is loyal to her friends and is often disappointed with how others jump to conclusions and don’t give her a second chance, she acknowledges that she often needs a second chance to get things right. She has an amazing amount of energy throughout all of her escapades.
 
Alexander Beck is on an archeological dig at Hartington Hall with a bunch of students and comes to Flick’s rescue. He is immediately attracted to Flick (Felicity) and is a great hero for the story in that he’s smart, charming and great looking. Beck and Flick have amazing physical chemistry from the time they meet but Beck also seems to have bad timing and repeatedly jumps to the wrong conclusion with Flick, which just increases the sexual tension between them. The romance between Flick and Beck is tender and sweet with occasional spicy moments. Beck has another connection to Harington Hall and that is the owner’s son, Giles, a university friend with whom he had several amusing escapades with at school.
 
The secondary characters in this story were great, if not all likeable at the beginning. There are Kirsten and Josh, Flicks tenants and housemates, who have a sweet romance of their own. Giles, Lady Celia’s son and Beck’s university friend, is not nice at the start of this story but he really grows and matures throughout the story and at the end is actually friends with Flick and helps to resolve one of her problems. Henry, Giles father and Lady Celia’s husband is a pivotal secondary character; he is by far one of Flicks biggest supporters from the start and is a joy to read. Henry and Flick even play a funny guessing game throughout the book. Lady Celia is rude throughout the book and not likeable but Is a well done antagonist in the story.
 
If you are looking for a funny and sweet romance with spicy elements then this is the book for you. This is the second book by Ms. Elsborg that I’ve had the pleasure to read and I look forward to reading more of her work.

Book Blurb for Digging Deeper

Archaeologist Beck isn’t expecting much to come out of this summer’s dig. While his colleague spends the summer in Italy, Beck draws the short straw supervising a group of archaeology students excavating on the grounds of Hartington Hall in Yorkshire. Little does Beck realize when he saves a redhead from the attentions of an amorous ram, that this accident-prone female will throw his ordered life into chaos.
 
The last thing Flick needs in her life is a digger, because some secrets are meant to stay buried. Very deep. But Beck is irresistible. She’d love to get him into bed, though after the incident at the swimming pool, the collapsing wall, the snake bite and the unexploded bomb—a hospital bed looks more likely. As their relationship lurches from one disaster to another, Beck has to delve deep to get to the bottom of this irrepressible redhead.
 
One thing is clear—you never know quite what you’re going to find when you start digging.

Night Owl Reviews Aug, 2010 5.00