Keys to the Castle

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Keys to the Castle

What would you do if you went to settle what you thought was going to be a meager estate is, in actuality, a castle? What if this coincided with a crossroads in your own life? And if, during your stay in the castle, you learned about some facets of the man you were beginning to know that brought him forth in a new light?

These are some of the questions to be found among the pages of Keys to the Castle as Sara Graves travels to France to settle her late husband's estate.

What I took away from the story is that the "keys to the castle" are not simply the physical keys to the castle, but metaphorical keys: to Sara's life, her future, her husband's past and the love she finds with Ashton "Ash" Lindeman (her late husband's best friend). As the story unfolds, Ash finds his own "keys" - to who he is, to changes he might wish to undertake, and to what is important.

Another aspect of the story that I found enjoyable is that both of the main characters were in what might be called "middle to late summer" of their lives. I found it to be a refreshing change from my usual reading.


Book Blurb for Keys to the Castle

The author of the Ladybug Farm series delivers an exhilarating new novel of a middle-aged woman who follows her heart to love and happiness.

When a dashing French poet swept forty-something workaholic Sara Graves off her feet, she did something completely unexpected: She married him. Then three weeks later he died, leaving her a house she can't afford to keep in a country she's never been to. Traveling to France to settle the estate, Sara is shocked to discover that her husband wasn't the impoverished poet he claimed to be- and that the estate he left her is a 400-year-old crumbling castle in the Loire Valley. Now Sara must sell Chateau Rondelais before it (not to mention her late husband's disarmingly handsome lawyer and best friend) makes her question her decision to leave-and opens her heart to change and all its unexpected possibilities.


Night Owl Reviews Mar, 2011 5.00