Facing the Hunchback of Notre Dame

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Facing the Hunchback of Notre Dame

The Enchanted Attic, #1

L.L. Samson puts a very interesting spin on things in The Enchanted Attic: Facing the Hunchback.

What I liked most about the book was the blending of different character personalities from Linus to Ophelia to Walter to Cato and, of course, Quasimodo and Rollo from The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

One thing I'm not too sure about being done is for Quasimodo and Rollo to be speaking English. The Hunchback is set in medieval France. The characters speaking English is explained as them coming through the circle from an English edition of the story - and that makes sense in the context of Samson's story. For me, doing this makes sense and, yet, it doesn't.

There are two things that I found to be a bit off-putting about the story. One is the narrator or, rather, the narrator's tone. It came across, for me, as a bit pompous. It may not do so for other readers. The other is the way part of the story was written. For example, using a word or phrase the reader may (or may not) be familiar with immediately followed by its definition. I found this to be distracting and would have liked to see one (word or phrase) or the other (meaning). Readers who may not understand something can either ask someone who may know or look it up.

Overall, I liked the story and characters, but did have a couple issues with it.


Book Blurb for Facing the Hunchback of Notre Dame

A hidden attic. A classic story. A very unexpected twist. Twin twelve-year-old bookworms Ophelia and Linus Easterday discover a hidden attic that once belonged to a mad scientist. While relaxing in the attic and enjoying her latest book, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Ophelia dozes off, and within moments finds herself facing a fully alive and completely bewildered Quasimodo. Ophelia and Linus team up with a clever neighbor, a hippy priest, and a college custodian, learning Quasimodo's story while searching for some way to get him back home---if he can survive long enough in the modern world.


Night Owl Reviews May, 2012 3.50