The Devil Wears Prada

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The Devil Wears Prada

A Novel

Fortunately, not too many books are hard for me to get through. More times than not, I can read a book cover-to-cover without much grumbling. Unfortunately, the only book this year I had trouble reading was The Devil Wears Prada written by Lauren Weisberger. From the very first sentence I knew I was in trouble.

This novel, which takes recent Brown graduate, Andrea Sachs into the world of fashion, had the potential to be genius. It may have been to others, but I found this novel to be monotonous, longwinded, and rather boring.

The Devil Wears Prada, in all of its 432 page glory, put me to sleep (literally) on more than one occasion. I could easily see that Weisberger is a very smart author. She used big words; words that I needed to look up in the dictionary, and wrote this novel with a flare of smartness that intimidated me.

The synopsis: Andrea Sachs, a small-town girl fresh out of college, lands the job “a million girls would die for.” Hired as the assistant to Miranda Priestly, the high-profile, fabulously successful editor of Runway magazine, Andrea finds herself in an office that shouts Prada! Armani! Versace! At every turn, a world populated by impossibly thin, heart-wrenchingly stylish women and beautiful men clad in fine-ribbed turtlenecks and tight leather pants that show off their lifelong dedication to the gym. With breathtaking ease, Miranda can turn each and every one of these hip sophisticates into a scared, whimpering child…

I was immediately captivated by the book description. A girl, hard-pressed for money, seeking a smart writing job at a newspaper, is given a chance when a fashion magazine hires her on. What could be so wrong with this? Answer: Andrea Sachs is working for the most important Fashion Editor in the world. Miranda Priestly, or the Devil Herself, is one scary lady. Anyone and everyone bows to Priestly, and if they do not, there are kicked to the curb.

I loved the idea, but I hated the execution. Weisberger’s writing style is monotonous and never seemed to hit a high. Every chapter felt like it took hours to read, when in actuality it was only a half-hour. The flat writing style will turn away most readers.

The longwinded chapters were filled with big words, foul language, and such stale commentary from Andrea’s point-of-view, it was difficult to stay focused. Weisberger tried to cram each chapter with so many details, I felt: lost, tired, and bored out of my mind with every new page.

I so wished for The Devil Wears Prada to be great, but it lacked the refreshing and entertaining factors I seek in each novel. I may, or may not, read Weidberger’s other works’; however, I will not be doing so in the near future.

To conclude, The Devil Wears Prada is better off being watched in the movie form.

Until next time,

Happy Reading!


Book Blurb for The Devil Wears Prada

A delightfully dishy novel about the all-time most impossible boss in the history of impossible bosses.

Andrea Sachs, a small-town girl fresh out of college, lands the job “a million girls would die for.” Hired as the assistant to Miranda Priestly, the high-profile, fabulously successful editor of Runway magazine, Andrea finds herself in an office that shouts Prada! Armani! Versace! at every turn, a world populated by impossibly thin, heart-wrenchingly stylish women and beautiful men clad in fine-ribbed turtlenecks and tight leather pants that show off their lifelong dedication to the gym. With breathtaking ease, Miranda can turn each and every one of these hip sophisticates into a scared, whimpering child.

THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA gives a rich and hilarious new meaning to complaints about “The Boss from Hell.” Narrated in Andrea’s smart, refreshingly disarming voice, it traces a deep, dark, devilish view of life at the top only hinted at in gossip columns and over Cosmopolitans at the trendiest cocktail parties. From sending the latest, not-yet-in-stores Harry Potter to Miranda’s children in Paris by private jet, to locating an unnamed antique store where Miranda had at some point admired a vintage dresser, to serving lattes to Miranda at precisely the piping hot temperature she prefers, Andrea is sorely tested each and every day—and often late into the night with orders barked over the phone. She puts up with it all by keeping her eyes on the prize: a recommendation from Miranda that will get Andrea a top job at any magazine of her choosing. As things escalate from the merely unacceptable to the downright outrageous, however, Andrea begins to realize that the job a million girls would die for may just kill her. And even if she survives, she has to decide whether or not the job is worth the price of her soul.


From the Hardcover edition.


Night Owl Reviews Dec, 2010 2.00