Vonna Harper

Read more about Vonna Harper.


Interview By: Tamazon

Date: August 16, 2011

Vonna Harper's Web Site

Interview

Shifters Storm | Samhain | paranormal erotic romance | Aug 16, 2011

She needs their courage-and their bodies. The feeling is mutual.

Law enforcement warnings be damned, nothing will stop Rane from returning to the Chinook Mountains to discover who murdered her mother, a fellow forest ranger. Except maybe the fact that her elk shifter lover, Songan, is in the middle of rut season.

The delay is just long enough for a newcomer from the far north, Ber, to enter the picture. A massive grizzly shifter with his own need-for Rane. His dark, brooding presence feeds dreams so erotic, she feels like she's losing her mind. Yet keeping him at arm's length isn't an option. She needs his heightened senses, along with Songan's, to follow the cold trail of her mother's final hours.

With winter closing in, the threesome heads for the mountains, where, in a cramped cabin, their mutual lust explodes. But the mountains can't shield them from deadly danger.

Please tell us your latest news!

How about two releases on the same day (Aug 16) on the heels of another on July 26? Okay, here's the short course.

1. Spirit of the Wolf, Kensington Aphrodisia--July.
2. Hunter's Captive, Loose-Id (Aug 16)
3. Shifters Storm, Samhain (Aug 16)

Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I don't remember when I wasn't interested in writing. Thanks to a remote and rural upbringing, the outside world reached me via the small school's library. I loved adventure tales. When I wasn't reading, my sister and I along with our friends hiked all over the mountains while I imagined adventures to go along with our hikes. One strong memory is of sitting in the classroom--there was only one--staring out the window as I imagined myself an Indian hiding from settlers. Or bears.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

It's simplistic, but I believe all writers need to wear two hats. One is the writer hat, pulled down around our ears to block out the outside world so we can dive into our imaginations. The other is the business hat because whether we like it or not, publishing is a business and we must understand it as much as possible.

Do you have a favorite object that is pertinent to your writing?

Hmm. Maybe the two wolf paintings and wolf calendar. I love the wild.

What main genre do you write in?

Erotica Romance

Please describe your writing environment.

Ah, I love it. My private sanctuary. It's upstairs and my desk is against a window that looks out at the hills--just ignore the top of one neighbor's roof. The space includes a bathroom so if I had a microwave and refrigerator, I could love up here. Couch for the dogs, recliner for me, TV for goofing, stereo for mood, nearly new computer (the 8 year old one recently bit the dust) and a huge monitor for these tired old eyes.

What's been the most challenging part of writing for you?

Stop playing on the Net and get to the getting. Seriously, I love chatting with other writers and readers or looking up obscure things just for the heck of it. I always have to give myself a jump start each day, but once I'm going, it's all good.

Tell us all about "The Call" or "The Email"!

That took place many years ago--I've been writing since dirt was new. Browbeaten by a friend, I'd submitted a manuscript to Harlequin American. That day I'd been at the hardware store buying material for the addition my husband and his friend were working on. When I walked in the door, my husband said, "-- just called. She wants you to call her back." He was grinning like an idiot and a few minutes later so was I.

What inspires your writing?

The human condition. I spent years as a social worker and what makes people tick fascinates me. Every time I hear of a person or group in crises (always more interesting than everything humming along), my mind is all over it. I mentally throw everying including the kitchen sink at my poor characters. As an example, in Shifters Storm, my heroine's mother has been murdered.

Do you have any animals? Do they influence your writing?

Two dogs, one big and black, the other small and white. Bruce is laid back while Scooter thinks she's a Pitt. They demand daily morning walks, the perfect opportunity for being alone with plot and characters. I don't think I could create without those walks. That said, there have been a few winter mornings--

If you had to choose one person to have dinner with, who would it be? And why?

I've answered one form or another of this question before, and my answer is always the same, my grandfather Homer Eon Flint. He died when my mother was six (possibly murdered) but he lives via the short stories and novels he wrote and had published while in his 20s and 30s. How I'd love to talk shop with him, thank him for passing the writing passion onto me, and ask him what happened that fatal day.

Signing Out: Vonna Harper