Francesca Hawley

Read more about Francesca Hawley.


Interview By: Tamazon

Date: January 31, 2011

Francesca Hawley's Web Site

Interview

Controlling Interest | Ellora's Cave Publishing | BDSM contemporary erotic romance | January 28, 2011

Mozelle "Mouse" Vincent inherits money, a club and her boss' son as a business partner when society leader Regine Stuart dies. Torin Stuart knows what his late mother's wishes were for his exclusive BDSM club, Erotically Bound, but he's pissed that he's forced to trust Mouse-especially when her inherently submissive nature arouses the sexual Dominant in him.

After baring all in a heated, intense scene, Mouse realizes they still have to work together, but now Tor challenges any business suggestion she makes. When she wants to offer education classes, Tor dares her to organize the class and participate-as a submissive.

To his chagrin, Mouse agrees, but he can't stand the thought of any other Dom touching her. Suddenly there's far more at stake than the controlling interest in their club.because love is the ultimate prize in their power exchange.

Please describe your writing environment.

My writing area is clutter central. I subscribe to the theory that a clean desk is a symptom of a strange mind. :-) I have a lot of research books on the shelves of my office area. There's also a lot of cat fur around the room.

What main genre do you write in?

Erotic Romance

Please tell us your latest news!

I'm really excited to have a new release from Ellora's Cave. Controlling Interest is part of the 1-800-DOM-help series.

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, I don't think so. When I originally wrote it, the story had another 5000 words but I had to cut it to make it novella length. I think cutting was the right decision. The story ended up much tighter and more focused on my hero and heroine. Big thanks to my critique partner, Paris Brandon. I was tearing my hair out but she helped me with the process.

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I don't have ONE favorite author. I like a variety of different authors who each have a different thing that really appeals to me about their work.

I love Joey W. Hill's stories because she writes intense and passionate stories with deep characters and smokin' hot sex scenes. I've just been re-reading some of my Mercedes Lackey fantasy novels. She does fabulous worldbuilding with strong plots. I love some of David Eddings stories too. He has come great skills with worldbuilding, but I adore the characters he created in his Belgariad fantasy series. Each member of the quest party is quirky and has a unique voice.

Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I can't remember NOT being interest in writing. I've always wanted to tell stories. I'd watch a TV show or movie and imagine how it could have ended differently. I even wrote a short story when I was in grade school. When I reached high school, I was writing (really bad) romances during my lunch break.

Do you write full time? What did you do before you became a writer? Or Still do?

I'm not able to write full time yet, though I hope that's in my future. I work as a reference librarian in a public library. I help people do research or find a good book to read every day and I like that.

What is your writing process? Do you outline, fly by the seat of your pants or a combination of both?

I'm a combo writer. I usually know the beginning, a few points along the way and I know the ending. Then I write from point to point. It doesn't work well for me to skip around or skip over sections. I need to write straight through. Sometimes when I'm writing, the characters or the story will take me off in a different direction and I'll usually let myself go there to see what happens - that's the pantser part of me.

Do you plan all your characters out before you start a story or do they develop as you write?

Both. I usually get the idea for the character before I start the story. Sometimes I know them well and sometimes I don't. But as I write the story, I learn more about the character. Things that often surprise me. Like when I wrote Controlling Interest, I discovered Mouse had been homeless. I had no clue about that when I first started, but this was an important part of who she is.

Do you like to mix genres?

I do. I love to read genre-blended stories and I love to write them too. My medieval romance, Seeking Truth, has paranormal elements. My paranormal romance, Protect and Defend, has suspense elements. I think it's fun to let the story go wherever it needs to go regardless of what the genre is.

What are your hobbies?

I've been a member of the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism) since 1997. The SCA is a group that does education and re-creation about the Middle Ages and Renaissance time period. I've learning about weaving, glass beadmaking, and feltmaking while I've been active. This background helped influence my interest in writing my medieval erotic romance, Seeking Truth.

How much research do you do for your books? Have you found any cool tidbits in your research?

The amount of research I do varies from story to story. In contemporary stories I don't have to research contemporary culture. But for Controlling Interest I did some research about rope bondage and other aspects of BDSM. When I wrote Whirlwind Affair, I did a bit of research about Minneapolis, where part of the story takes place. In the medieval romance I wrote, I needed to research sword combat and life in a castle. What foods would be eaten and what herbs might be used for healing and pain relief.

Do you have a website recommendation for other writers?

Yes...and this comes from the librarian in me. When someone comes up to my reference desk wanting to know about their favorite authors, the first place I go to is an author's web site. A web site should be easy to navigate. Give the reader a clear place to find your books. Make sure the cover is pictured. Make sure to include the blurb. And most especially, include a printer-friendly list if you have a lot of books out. If you write in a series, list all the books in the order they should be read. So often, a reader asks me to print out a list of all the books by their favorite author. Help a librarian out by providing a comprehensive list...please. :-)

Thanks so much for interviewing me for your readers. I really enjoyed it.

Francesca Hawley

Romance with Dangerous Curves