Author: Melissa Schorr

Melissa Schorr is the author of the YA novels IDENTITY CRISIS and GOY CRAZY, and a contributor to the anthology DEAR BULLY: SEVENTY AUTHORS TELL THEIR STORIES. She is also a widely published freelance journalist currently living outside Boston.

As a native New Yorker, she grew up in the Riverdale section

of the Bronx and attended the Bronx High School of Science and Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism outside of Chicago.

She has served as a stringer for People magazine in San Francisco, a columnist for the Las Vegas Sun, a staff features reporter for the Oakland Tribune, a health writer for ABCNews.com in Boston, and most recently a contributing editor at the Boston Globe Sunday Magazine.

Her work has also appeared in more than 20 publications, including Glamour, Self, Allure, Marie Claire, Bride’s, Baby Talk, Working Mother, In Style, Esquire, San Francisco, National Geographic Traveler, Wired magazine, as well as newspapers such as the Chicago Tribune, The Wall Street Journal and the San Jose Mercury News, The New York Times' Motherlode blog, and websites including ReutersHealth and WebMD.

Schorr currently lives outside Boston, Mass., with her husband, her two daughters, and her dog, Bailey.

Library

Identity Crisis

Identity Crisis
  • Stars
  • Number: 9781440590139
  • Release: 2016-01-01
  • Author: Melissa Schorr
  • Genre: YA
  • Tags: * Contemporary, * Young Adult
  • Publisher: Merit Press
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Who does she think she is? Annalise's audacious freshman-year hookup with Cooper Franklin has a trio of friends thirsting for revenge. So they catfish Annalise by creating the perfect virtual guy, with Noelle playing along reluctantly only because her lifelong crush, Cooper, is in love with Annalise. As Annalise falls for it, even buying tickets for the concert of the year for her and her mythical new guy, Noelle feels more and more guilty. Then, the whole thing blows up and Annalise faces her betrayers. But when Annalise forgives, the reunited friends learn that adults--even famous adults--can be even more bogus than teenagers.