Author: Arlene Weintraub

Arlene Weintraub is a science journalist and author with 20 years of experience writing about healthcare, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. Her first book, Selling the Fountain of Youth (Basic Books 2010), is an expose on the anti-aging industry. Her upcoming book, Heal: The Vital Role of Dogs in the Search for Cancer Cures (ECW Press 2015), will bring to life the world of comparative oncology and the many ways dogs are helping in the war on cancer. Weintraub’s freelance pieces have been published in the New York Times, US News & World Report, More, New Scientist, USA Today, Entrepreneur.com, Fierce Markets, and other media outlets. She was previously a senior health writer based out of the New York City headquarters of BusinessWeek, where she wrote hundreds of articles that explored both the science and business of health. She also worked as an editor for Xconomy.com, covering the biotech industry on the East Coast, as well as technology, life sciences and clean technology companies in the greater New York City area. She has won awards from the New York Press Club, the Association of Health Care Journalists, the Foundation for Biomedical Research, and the American Society of Business Publication Editors.

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Heal - The Vital Role of Dogs in the Search for Cancer Cures

Heal
  • 5 Stars
  • Number: 9781770412705
  • Release: 2015-10-13
  • Author: Arlene Weintraub
  • Genre: Mainstream
  • Tags: Animals & Pets
  • Publisher: Ecw Press
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Man’s best friend could help cure man’s greatest scourge

Drawn from extensive research, on-the-ground reporting, and personal experience, this book explores the fascinating role dogs are playing in the search for cures for cancer. Learn how veterinarians and oncologists are working together to discover new treatments ? cutting-edge therapies designed to help both dogs and people suffering from cancer.

Heal introduces readers to the field of comparative oncology by describing several research projects aimed at finding new therapies for cancers that are similar in dogs and people, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, breast cancer, melanoma, and gastric cancer. Weintraub, who lost her sister to gastric cancer, also writes about the emerging science behind the remarkable ability of dogs to sniff out early stage cancer and the efforts underway to translate that talent into diagnostic devices for early detection of the disease. In the course of bringing these dogs and their human companions to life, Weintraub takes her own personal journey from grief to healing, as she shows her readers how man’s best friend might be the key to unlocking the mysteries of cancer.


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